What’s Wrong with the World?

Americans are fond of asking what’s wrong with contemporary America.

I’ve also noticed that those who strongly and publicly posit answers to the question almost always identify some movement, ideology or social practice—the dreaded “isms”—of which the speaker is a staunch opponent.

In other words, the problem, according to so many people, is “out there”; “other people’s thoughts”; “the fruit of others’ bad labor or ignorance.”

The Catholic Year of Faith, inaugurated by Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI, will draw to a close in late November. The purpose of the Year of Faith, occurring in the midst of the Church’s new evangelization effort, is for Catholics to renew and rejuvenate their own faith and anchor themselves more deeply in the life-giving graces of the Christ and his Church, so that they can be better workers in the Lord’s vineyard.

Would that more Americans took a leaf out of this book.

When G.K. Chesterton was asked what was wrong with the world, his answer was simple. And I like his attitude, one that undoubtedly will lead to more good than any amount of finger-pointing.

“My dear sirs—I am!”